Notification of Limited Account Access 1

Clearly the use of graphics software is beyond the limited skills of this scammer.  I’m sure you can see all the obvious clues that this email doesn’t come from PayPal.

I’m addressed as “PayPal Customer” – I’m sure you know that all genuine Paypal communications include your username.

The email was sent from PayPal@mail.nu.

If you open that attached html page – you are taken to a page where you are asked for all your credit card details.

If you think you might have accidentally given your credit card details to a scammer, contact your bank immediately.

If you think there might be a problem with your PayPal account, log in to your real account by entering the address of the PayPal website directly into your browser.  NEVER click on a link in a PayPal email.

Dear PayPal Customer : PayPal is committed to maintaining a safe environment for its community of customers. To protect the security of your account, PayPal employs some of the most advanced security systems in the world and our anti-fraud teams regularly screen the PayPal system for unusual activity. We are contacting you to remind you, our Account Review Team identified some unusual activity in your account. In accordance with PayPal’s User Agreement and to ensure that your account has not been compromised, access to your account was limited. Your account access will remain limited until this issue has been resolved. To secure your account and quickly restore full access, we may require some additional information from you for the following reason: We have been notified that a card associated with your account has been reported as lost or stolen, or that there were additional problems with your card. This process is mandatory, and if not completed within the nearest time your account or credit card may be

One comment on “Notification of Limited Account Access

  1. Reply Alison Nov 16,2010 12:14 pm

    This looked mildly convincing until I noticed a few oddities. Namely, their attachment was paypal_from.htm rather than “form”, they mis-spelled department as “departament”, and all their references to paypal were actually spelled “PayPaI”. Also, the email itself ended mid-sentence.
    Absolutely a fraud and not a very good one at that.
    In my experience, these tiny details are the giveaway. I’m thankful that I’m a proof-reader by trade!

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